1. Stroke and heart disease account for 38% of all deaths in New Zealand.
  2. 28% of cancer-related deaths are of people aged between 25 and 64.
  3. Five in ten males are likely to become disabled due to an illness or accident before they turn 65, preventing them from working for at least a month.
  4. Seven in ten females are likely to become disabled due to an illness or accident before they turn 65, preventing them from working for at least a month. Of these, nearly a third will still be on claim twelve months later.
  5. Every year, about 8,000 people in New Zealand have strokes (22 people per day).
  6. Fifty-two per cent of male cancer patients will be alive five years later; 59% of females will be alive five years later.
  7. One in five men and one in seven women between the ages of 30 and 64 will suffer a critical illness.
  8. In 2007, there were 19,736 new cancer cases and 8,519 cancer deaths in New Zealand.
  9. Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in New Zealand, accounting for 40% of deaths annually; approximately 11,300.
  10. Prostate cancer occurs mainly in men aged over 65 years and is the most common cancer among New Zealand men. Around 2,000 to 3,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in New Zealand each year.
  1. Statistics New Zealand, 2009, New Zealand Life Tables: 2005/07
  2. Morality and Demographic data, New Zealand Health Information Service, 2005 (provisional data)
  3. Davies Financial and Actuarial
  4. Davies Financial and Actuarial
  5. The Stoke Foundation of New Zealand, 2010
  6. South Australian Cancer Registry, 2003
  7. Gen Re LifeHealth, Australian Critical Illness Survey 2008
  8. Ministry of Health – Cancer: New registrations and deaths, 2007
  9. Heart Foundation of New Zealand, 2010
  10. Cancer Society of New Zealand, 2007